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Archive | Critique

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Adam Connor and Aaron Irizarry

What are your questions about critique?

Both Adam and I have been presenting the content we post on Discussing Design as a team and as individuals at conferences and for design teams over the last few years, as we continue to share the content in presentations and workshops we want to hear from you about your experience (good or bad) with […]

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Critique is Central to Good Collaboration

Why is it that we created a whole blog dedicated to the topic of critique? People ask us this all the time. I’m not kidding when I say that at least 2 people audibly laughed at me when I told them the idea. On the surface critique seems like a pretty straight forward thing. But […]

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A Path Back to Critique: What to do when the client sends you their own design instead of feedback on yours.

Most of us have been in situations where, instead of getting what we’d consider to be useful feedback on our designs, we get a list of changes to make to it. And often this list doesn’t include a clear indication of why the changes should be made. Beyond that some of the changes might be […]

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Design Reviews vs. Design Critique

In the time that Aaron and I have been sharing our thoughts on critique, we’ve had a lot of opportunities to speak with designers, developers, project managers, etc. about their organizations and how they’ve incorporated critique (or haven’t) as a part of their process. In those conversations, the topic of Design Reviews often comes up. […]

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Avoid Problem Solving For Better Critiques

People have a tendency to jump to a solution before they fully articulate the problem that they’ve found. Design Researchers see this all the time in usability studies, interviews, etc. Participants frequently make statements that begin with phrases along the lines of “It should do…”, “I wish it did…” or “What they should have done […]

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